SEDS Chapters on Google Maps

Note: I wrote this on my earlier blog hosted as https://blogs.seds.org/pradeep. I recovered the text from the WayBack Machine. This post appeared on November 21, 2007 as per the timestamp. I’m trying to collect here again all my old writings spread on various blogs.

I have been using Google Maps for many small things till now. I have a cycling map among other things, if you wanted to know. I thought I could try and put it together with my activities on the SEDS-Earth Council. And what I came up with a map  with all the international SEDS chapters on one map.

This is what it looks like:

Update: The embed function doesn’t seem to work. So, here’s the link

Now, this is not the end of it. I’ll try and make a map precisely locating all the SEDS chapters in India. If you have 5-10 minutes you can do the same. It doesn’t take a genius to do the maps and it’s great to see where people actually are from and how their places look from satellite images. Kind of like a vicious circle, I would say.

Chandrayaan Video

Note: I wrote this on my earlier blog hosted as https://blogs.seds.org/pradeep. I recovered the text from the WayBack Machine. This post appeared on November 21, 2007 as per the timestamp. I’m trying to collect here again all my old writings spread on various blogs.

If you like to know what the latest India’s moon mission is about, you might want to take a look at this video.

Sorry, but embedding the video (this video has been disabled) and a higher resolution one is available here.

Update: Found a longer and more descriptive version which can be embedded here:

GLXP Auxillary Event

Note: I wrote this on my earlier blog hosted as https://blogs.seds.org/pradeep. I recovered the text from the WayBack Machine. This post appeared on November 19, 2007 as per the timestamp. I’m trying to collect here again all my old writings spread on various blogs.

Google Moon is something that I’d like to utilise in connection with the GLXP going on currently. People are designing landers and if you don’t feel confident enough to waste money, effort and time on working a full scale moon lander, I was wondering if we could take some time out to study landing sites for the lander.

NASA is sending the Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter later next year to scout the moon. What I suggest is using Google Moon for the same. Then, after the LRO shares its results with the public (will they?) we can compare our results with theirs. If you’re already a Google Moon fanatic, all this will involve is devoting some of your moon scouting for looking for a landing site. Just an idea!

Also, if anyone can point this blog post to the people at GLXP, nothing like it!!

You can also plan this event as an auxillary to your moon missions. We at SEDS India are certainly thinking about such an event.

India successfully tests its cryogenic upper stage

Note: I wrote this on my earlier blog hosted as https://blogs.seds.org/pradeep. I recovered the text from the WayBack Machine. This post appeared on November 19, 2007 as per the timestamp. I’m trying to collect here again all my old writings spread on various blogs.

The third stage of India’s latest satellite launch vehicle, the GSLV is cryogenic. On November 15, 2007, ISRO successfully tested the indigenously built cryogenic rocket engine that will power the GSLV third stage. Till now, India depended on Russia for its cryogenic third stage but the test now allows India to use its own.

Developed by the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre and supported by ISRO centres, public and private companies, it’s a milestone worth taking note of.

The press release describes the rocket as:

The indigenous Cryogenic Upper Stage (CUS) is powered by a regeneratively cooled cryogenic engine, which works on staged combustion cycle developing a thrust of 69.5 kN in vacuum. The other stage systems include insulated propellant tanks, booster pumps, inter-stage structures, fill and drain systems, pressurisation systems, gas bottles, command block, igniters, pyro valves and cold gas orientation and stabilisation system. Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) from the respective tanks are fed by individual booster pumps to the main turbo-pump, which rotates at 39,000 rpm to ensure a high flow rate of 16.5 kg/sec of propellants into the combustion chamber. The main turbine is driven by the hot gas produced in a pre-burner. Thrust control and mixture ratio control are achieved by two independent regulators. LOX and Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2) are ignited by pyrogen type igniters in the pre-burner as well as in the main and steering engines.

Congragulations to ISRO for a successful test firing.

Leaving SEDSAT-2

Note: I wrote this on my earlier blog hosted as https://blogs.seds.org/pradeep. I recovered the text from the WayBack Machine. This post appeared on November 12, 2007 as per the timestamp. I’m trying to collect here again all my old writings spread on various blogs.

After my post on tying things up, this might come as a surprise to many of you. But, things in practise never match up to our plans.

Both, academic and life in my house have been getting stuffy enough so that I can’t concentrate on more technical stuff than I am already handling at school.

Also, working on SEDS India holds a higher priority for me than working on SEDSAT-2. I think we’ve reached a point in SEDSAT-2 where you can be reasonably sure of its success and continuity. It’s been great hanging around with all you guys – discussing, playing around, serious discussions etc. Hope you can launch the baby by the end of 2008 as planned.